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Chris Evans

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Top Stories by Chris Evans

If the weekend IT press is to be believed, EMC are on the verge of acquiring solid-state array vendor XtremIO in a deal worth around $450 million.  This would be a remarkable outcome for a company that is still technically “in stealth mode” and has no obvious revenue or customers. Why would EMC do this?  Their normal acquisition process is to look for targets that have well established customer bases, such as Isilon or Greenplum.  XtremIO’s technology is unvalidated in the marketplace and there are already many other competitors out there; Violin Memory and Pure Storage to name only two. In February EMC announced two new products, codenamed Lightning and Thunder (details).  Lightning became VFCache, a PCIe SSD card and was due to ship pretty much immediately.  However, Thunder was described in more ephemeral terms, with no real substance.  Did Thunder really exist a... (more)

Storage in Cloud Is Not the Center of the Universe

In a previous post, I touched on the need to have APIs for managing storage in cloud environments.  In this post, I’ll talk about how the way in which storage is deployed in cloud environments has to change. For the last 10 years, the advent of Storage Area Networks (SANs) has created a storage-centric view of the world with storage at the centre and the “planets” – networking and servers – wrapped around it like some pre-Copernican view of the universe.  Over time, SANs have evolved to be ever bigger, with some organisations deploying huge fibre channel fabrics.  As we’ve seen ... (more)

Is the Performance of All Cloud Servers the Same?

One of the benefits of delivering Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) through the cloud is an abstraction from the underlying hardware delivering the service.  There’s no requirement to understand what technology is being used to deliver, for example, cloud servers.  The specification of a cloud-based server is based on a few simple metrics, CPU, memory and disk space. CPU or processor power is described by most vendors in terms of cores, which translate to some abstract definition of physical computing power.  Only Amazon Web Services (AWS) reference physical CPU architecture, w... (more)

Analysis: Dell's Alleged Bid for Fusion-IO

Last Friday Eric Savitz over at Forbes reported that Dell may have put in a speculative bid for Fusion-IO (thanks to Don Jennings for spotting the article).  The rumoured price was $33 a share, which is approximately a 50% markup on the share price at the time – we can only assume the offer was rejected. As Chris Mellor recently reported, Fusion-IO have been increasing revenue but making a loss and Eric Savitz also noted that 55% of their revenue comes from just two companies – Apple and Facebook.  From what I understand there are also other storage companies that also contribut... (more)

HP Cloud Now Available In Beta – A First Look

HP have joined the Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) market and released their HP Cloud service in public beta.  Here’s the announcement press release.  The services on offer are: Available Now as Public Beta Compute – on-demand server instances. Cloud Object Storage – object-based storage using RESTful APIs. Content Delivery Network – local distribution of web content. Still in Private Beta Cloud Block Storage – persistent data for compute images Relational Database for MySQL – managed cloud databases There’s also the HP Identity Service for managing key & token access managem... (more)